Get the latest PS3 Jailbreak free!

Latest PS3 Jailbreak 4.66

Latest PS3 Jailbreak news

Current Custom firmware version is at 4.66 with full online access including gaming, shop and DLC.

If you are interested in finding out How to Jailbreak PS3 on 4.66 firmware then you should do so now as we have no way of knowing how long it will be until a new OFW update blocks the latest Jailbreak method.

For the time being though its still a simple case of installing the latest CFW over the firmware on your PS3 much like you would with an official firmware. It is recomended to use the Recoivery Menu for this purpose for extra safety.

Get the latest PS3 Jailbreak 4.66

First download the latest free Custom Firmware (CFW) from the download here link.

PS3 Jailbreak Download

You will then need to extract the "PS3" folder to the root folder of a USB drive. If done correctly this will give you a folder called PS3 containing another folder named UPDATE. Inside that you should have the PS3UPDAT.PUP file. If this is not in the correct folder your PS3 will not see the update in the next stage.

Next, with your PS3 turned off at the power insert your USB drive into the left most slot. You now need to enter recovery mode on your PS3. To do this hold the PS3's on/off button while switching on the power. Keep the button pressed until you hear two beeps and the PS3 will shutdown again. Release the on/off button and press it and hold once again until you hear the first beep - then let go. You will now see the PS3's Recovery Menu on the screen.

From the Recovery menu install the PS3 Jailbreak CFW from your USB drive and wait for your PS3 to reboot. Once rebooted you will have a new uption on the game menu to "Install Package Files". These are the PKG files you can now install on your PS3 such as backup managers, homebrew and emulators.

Back up the Latest PS3 Games

With your Custom Firmware updated to the latest 4.66 version you can back up any game to either an external USB hard drive or the PS3's own internal storage. With the Latest PSN/SEN passphrase included you can then play the games online exactly as you would on a non Jailbroken PS3 with an original game disk.

How to Jailbreak PS3 on 4.66

Multiman is the most popular backup manager for the PS3 as it combines many needed tools into one easy to use application. Here's a demo video showing how simple it is to switch between games and play them online without getting banned.

The latest release of Multiman can be downloaded from here (PKG file) and needs to be installed via the "Install Packages" menu item before you can backup games.

Multiman also includes a built in FTP and file manager for easily moving files between your PC and the PS3's internal storage. To backup multiple games at once you will need an external USB drive. Emulator ROM's also now appear in the Multiman game selection screens. Once you have Multiman installed you can explore the Homebrew channel for more great downloads and cheats.

Free download for all PS3 versions

PS3 Jailbreak Download

Latest version PS3 Jailbreak 4.66

Great homebrew and Emulators

For many people PS3 game backups are maybe not the most important feature of a Jailbroken PS3. With Jailbreaking you open up the whole world of PS3 Homebrew for you to explore. The available homebrew ranges from Arcade games and remakes to various file and internet utilities. The most popular homebrew however is the wide range of emulators covering almost all classic game home and arcade systems. The SNES, Megadrive, Amiga, N64, Gameboy, Atari consoles and more are fully emulated as well as classic arcade machines in the form of Mame roms or classic tape or disk based games from the 80's and 90's computers Spectrum, C64, BBC and Amiga.

What is the history of the PS3 Jailbreak scene?

Several coders proclaimed the Sony PS3 security system was an epic fail and stood up in the Chaos Communications convention.

But with the key - basically an extended sequence - Fail0verflow coders would have the ability then construct programs that may run on any system and to compile their own custom firmware. (It is possible to see their presentation here)

The hackers and create custom firmware emulators etc will target Sony's hardware, but it is third party publishers and programmers that have the most. The license fee they pay for every piece of software to Sony they sell is a fee - the cost of selling software on a platform where piracy is not easy or darn-near impossible. Now that was taken away from them, with the PS3 appearing set to become the simplest platform to pirate applications for - simpler even compared to Wii, DS or PSP, all infamous piracy targets but all of which need some level of technical knowledge to get pirated applications operating.

Sony to put it differently, owes it to the games movie studios and publishers who create products because of its machine to keep a safe, protected platform. When Geohot revealed that exploits were not impossible via OtherOS, the entire notion was endangered. Sony has found game publishers evacuating the PSP platform, it may have believed that there was little selection here.

As time goes on, will there be a method that console manufacturers could appease hobbyist coders?

Bearing this in your mind, Space Rogue reckons it is time for games console makers to cease seeing homebrew coders. "Essentially makers really should begin using the chance that their hardware will be changed," he asserts. "Doing thus should be viewed as a profit center rather than loss of sales. Look at the Linksys WRT chain of routers. A lot of those happen to be sold especially because individuals could mod them and run their own software.

"Sony and other firms are still attempting lock down the hardware in a bid to shield their content. The remedy here is welcome tinkerers, to open up the hardware and create loyalty to your own brand. Another model is the Microsoft Kinect: Micosoft initially attempted to lock down it but after it was opened by individuals up anyhow, MS realised they could not keep it opened up the stage resulting in more sales and shut. Sadly, according to previous moves by Sony downgraders doubt they'll take exactly the same strategy and the cat and mouse game will continue."

The fundamental issue remains however: the platform open once it is open to hobbyists. Plus, many members of the community that is coding are not likely to be appeased by a walled garden way of hardware access, like Microsoft's XNA design which enable Xbox 360 games to be created by house coders for supply. As Dark Saviour indicates, "I believe they've some interest, but because they're usually restricted for some reason, either by permits or how much of the games consoles 'electricity', they are able to use, they do not have the same allure as homebrew.

Interestingly however, Apple itself is in the same scenario to Sony. The new Mac App store was hacked within 24 hours of its start, enabling pirated software to be put on the stage. Once more, the approach has involved replacing signature files on programs that were illicit to ensure they are seen by the security system as official releases.

It is a war of attrition between hackers and manufacturing companies, but it's one where the resources are completely asynchronous. Games Console businesses have the cash to finance security systems that are ever more complex, but they need to send hardware sooner or later, and customers is only going to put up with a lot of firmware upgrades and attribute set changes. Sony has yet to remark on the PS3 hack, but is certainly looking into its legal alternatives, which will probably be small and complicated.

Like many members they are completely anti-piracy - games console security systems are bypassed by its members just as an intellectual challenge, or to run programs and their own operating systems. Thus, the group did not the key is revealed by itself. And the floodgates that have kept wide scale piracy on the games console could be smashed to bits.

Games Console hacking of the kind continues to be part for over a decade. Sega's Dreamcast games console, established in 1999, was among the very first objectives that are important, easy access, and favoured by homebrew coders because of its strong hardware, on-line functionality. The first Xbox also proved to be a simple machine thanks in part to some leaked SDK, which gave lowlevel access to coders.

Both PSP and the Nintendo DS have been hacked, also, opening the doors to homebrew programs but to uncontrolled piracy. There are products available for Nintendo's handheld that enable gamers to download pirated titles on one cartridge in the internet and shop tons. It has additionally seen tons of publishers and third party developers abandoning the platforms.

Generally, what occurs in these scenarios is a race. An exploit distributed and will be formulated and the console manufacturer will release a firmware upgrade that plugs the opening. This duplicates, and with systems that are popular like the PSP, the hackers simply keep coming back. It is rather a system that is strong, has a homebrew library that is huge, and getting homebrew running isn't that difficult. There are many that claim the PSP would never have sold as nicely as is has without the excellent homebrew landscape."

Naturally, the producers do not see it that way. A year ago, Microsoft took the additional measure if gamers were discovered to be running pirated or backup copies of games of banning them from Xbox Live. That may be a chance for Sony, but upgrading the firmware isn't any longer an alternative: the PS3 hack changes the center of the encryption system that is whole; the lone way to shut the door would be to establish new hardware using an completely unique security set up.

Was this consistently an inevitability? They maintain when Sony made your decision to disable the Other OS functionality of the machine work just began on the PS3 system. This characteristic enabled owners to install their own Linux OS giving them the power to load programs developed by other users, and to create and run their own programs. It was an invitation that is interesting to the 1997 start of the Net Yaroze, a specific programmable variation of the first PlayStation games console, that has been trusted by house coders, harking back to the programming community and by universities setting up games development classes at the time.

Yet, at the conclusion George Hotz declared via his website he was trying to hack the PS3. Geohot released components exploit leaving the remaining work, and avoided the hypervisor.

Sony's answer was to issue Firmware upgrade v3.21, which disabled Other OS, removing the Linux functionality and shutting the system to house coders. The move was a red rag

But did Sony actually have a lot of alternative? And that is the center of it - the maker's "amusement associates" rely on the business to ensure their merchandises are not exposed to piracy. As Gamesindustry.biz points out within an editorial

It is not impossible that hacks can be accessible, enabling games console owners to download game ROMs onto Blu-ray discs, USB sticks or hard drives - these may run to the games console hardware without mods. It sets Sony Computer Entertainment as the music and movie industries. Maybe all the business can do is learn a lesson that is very costly about the development of encryption systems, a lesson that must subsequently apply to any future games consoles, or to the generation of either another iteration of PS3. For now, it's an open stage on its hands and, quite likely, some exceptionally pressing questions.

But with the key - basically an extended sequence - Fail0verflow coders would have the ability then construct programs that may run on any system and to compile their own custom firmware. (It is possible to see their presentation here)

The hackers and create custom firmware emulators etc will target Sony's hardware, but it is third party publishers and programmers that have the most. The license fee they pay for every piece of software to Sony they sell is a fee - the cost of selling software on a platform where piracy is not easy or darn-near impossible. Now that was taken away from them, with the PS3 appearing set to become the simplest platform to pirate applications for - simpler even compared to Wii, DS or PSP, all infamous piracy targets but all of which need some level of technical knowledge to get pirated applications operating.

Sony to put it differently, owes it to the games movie studios and publishers who create products because of its machine to keep a safe, protected platform. When Geohot revealed that exploits were not impossible via OtherOS, the entire notion was endangered. Sony has found game publishers evacuating the PSP platform, it may have believed that there was little selection here.

As time goes on, will there be a method that console manufacturers could appease hobbyist coders?

Bearing this in your mind, Space Rogue reckons it is time for games console makers to cease seeing homebrew coders. "Essentially makers really should begin using the chance that their hardware will be changed," he asserts. "Doing thus should be viewed as a profit center rather than loss of sales. Look at the Linksys WRT chain of routers. A lot of those happen to be sold especially because individuals could mod them and run their own software.

"Sony and other firms are still attempting lock down the hardware in a bid to shield their content. The remedy here is welcome tinkerers, to open up the hardware and create loyalty to your own brand. Another model is the Microsoft Kinect: Micosoft initially attempted to lock down it but after it was opened by individuals up anyhow, MS realised they could not keep it opened up the stage resulting in more sales and shut. Sadly, according to previous moves by Sony downgraders doubt they'll take exactly the same strategy and the cat and mouse game will continue."

The fundamental issue remains however: the platform open once it is open to hobbyists. Plus, many members of the community that is coding are not likely to be appeased by a walled garden way of hardware access, like Microsoft's XNA design which enable Xbox 360 games to be created by house coders for supply. As Dark Saviour indicates, "I believe they've some interest, but because they're usually restricted for some reason, either by permits or how much of the games consoles 'electricity', they are able to use, they do not have the same allure as homebrew.

Interestingly however, Apple itself is in the same scenario to Sony. The new Mac App store was hacked within 24 hours of its start, enabling pirated software to be put on the stage. Once more, the approach has involved replacing signature files on programs that were illicit to ensure they are seen by the security system as official releases.

It is a war of attrition between hackers and manufacturing companies, but it's one where the resources are completely asynchronous. Games Console businesses have the cash to finance security systems that are ever more complex, but they need to send hardware sooner or later, and customers is only going to put up with a lot of firmware upgrades and attribute set changes. Sony has yet to remark on the PS3 hack, but is certainly looking into its legal alternatives, which will probably be small and complicated.

Like many members they are completely anti-piracy - games console security systems are bypassed by its members just as an intellectual challenge, or to run programs and their own operating systems. Thus, the group did not the key is revealed by itself. And the floodgates that have kept wide scale piracy on the games console could be smashed to bits.

Games Console hacking of the kind continues to be part for over a decade. Sega's Dreamcast games console, established in 1999, was among the very first objectives that are important, easy access, and favoured by homebrew coders because of its strong hardware, on-line functionality. The first Xbox also proved to be a simple machine thanks in part to some leaked SDK, which gave lowlevel access to coders.

Both PSP and the Nintendo DS have been hacked, also, opening the doors to homebrew programs but to uncontrolled piracy. There are products available for Nintendo's handheld that enable gamers to download pirated titles on one cartridge in the internet and shop tons. It has additionally seen tons of publishers and third party developers abandoning the platforms.

Generally, what occurs in these scenarios is a race. An exploit distributed and will be formulated and the console manufacturer will release a firmware upgrade that plugs the opening. This duplicates, and with systems that are popular like the PSP, the hackers simply keep coming back. It is rather a system that is strong, has a homebrew library that is huge, and getting homebrew running isn't that difficult. There are many that claim the PSP would never have sold as nicely as is has without the excellent homebrew landscape."

Naturally, the producers do not see it that way. A year ago, Microsoft took the additional measure if gamers were discovered to be running pirated or backup copies of games of banning them from Xbox Live. That may be a chance for Sony, but upgrading the firmware isn't any longer an alternative: the PS3 hack changes the center of the encryption system that is whole; the lone way to shut the door would be to establish new hardware using an completely unique security set up.

Was this consistently an inevitability? They maintain when Sony made your decision to disable the Other OS functionality of the machine work just began on the PS3 system. This characteristic enabled owners to install their own Linux OS giving them the power to load programs developed by other users, and to create and run their own programs. It was an invitation that is interesting to the 1997 start of the Net Yaroze, a specific programmable variation of the first PlayStation games console, that has been trusted by house coders, harking back to the programming community and by universities setting up games development classes at the time.

Yet, at the conclusion George Hotz declared via his website he was trying to hack the PS3. Geohot released components exploit leaving the remaining work, and avoided the hypervisor.

Sony's answer was to issue Firmware upgrade v3.21, which disabled Other OS, removing the Linux functionality and shutting the system to house coders. The move was a red rag

But did Sony actually have a lot of alternative? And that is the center of it - the maker's "amusement associates" rely on the business to ensure their merchandises are not exposed to piracy. As Gamesindustry.biz points out within an editorial

It is not impossible that hacks can be accessible, enabling games console owners to download game ROMs onto Blu-ray discs, USB sticks or hard drives - these may run to the games console hardware without mods. It sets Sony Computer Entertainment as the music and movie industries. Maybe all the business can do is learn a lesson that is very costly about the development of encryption systems, a lesson that must subsequently apply to any future games consoles, or to the generation of either another iteration of PS3. For now, it's an open stage on its hands and, quite likely, some exceptionally pressing questions.

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